SENS

Shakespeare’s Narrative Sources: Italian Novellas and Their European Dissemination

Romeo and Juliet – Intertextualities

 

SHARED IMAGERY

 

As snow against the sun

BAN 11

                                                                                   Aveva tra

gli altri Romeo un compagno al quale troppo altamente

incresceva che quello, senza speranza di conseguir guiderdone

alcuno, dietro ad essa donna andasse perdendo il tempo della sua

giovinezza col fior degli anni suoi; onde tra molte altre volte una

così gli parlò: “Romeo, a me che come fratello ti amo, troppo di

noia dà il vederti a questo modo come neve al sole consumare; e

poi che tu vedi con tutto ciò che fai e spendi, e senza onor e

profitto spendi, che tu non puoi trar costei che ad amarti si

pieghi, e che cosa che tu adopri non ti giova, anzi più ritrosa la

ritrovi, a che più indarno affaticarti?

BOA 7 (61-5)

Car amour le sollicitait de si près, et lui avait

si bien empreinte la beauté de la damoiselle

en l’intérieur de son cœur, que n’y pouvant

plus résister ilsuccombait au faix, et se

fondait peu à peu comme la neige au soleil

BR: 9 (92-8)

In sighs, in tears, in plaint, in care,

         in sorrow and unrest,

   He moans the day, he wakes

         the long and weary night;

So deep hath love with piercing hand,

         ygraved her beauty bright

   Within his breast, and hath

         so mastered quite his heart,

That he of force must yield as thrall,

         no way is left to start.

   He cannot stay his step,

         but forth still must he run;

He languisheth and melts away,

        as snow against the sun.

PAI 7

he fainted with the charge and

consumed by little and little as the snow against the Sun.

 

 

 

 

As in a tempest tossed

BAN 85

Ella restò sì

stordita che proprio pareva tócca dalla saetta del folgorante

tuono.

BAN 92

Me poi liberarete da una grandissima

vergogna, e tutta la casa mia, perciò che se altra via non ci sarà a

levarmi fuor di questo tempestoso mare ove ora in sdruscito

legno senza governo mi ritrovo,

BR 21 (211-13)

   When Romeus saw himself

         in this new tempest tossed,

Where both was hope of pleasant port,

         and danger to be lost,

   He doubtful, scarcely knew

         what countenance to keep;

 

BR 21 (1514-126)

Like days the painful mariners

        are wonted to assay;

   For, beat with tempest great,

        when they at length espy

Some little beam of Phoebus’ light,

        that pierceth through the sky,

   To clear the shadowed earth

        by clearness of his face,

They hope that dreadless they shall run

        the remnant of their race;

   Yea, they assure themselves,

        and quite behind their back

They cast all doubt, and thank the gods

        for ’scaping of the wrack;

   But straight the boisterous winds

        with greater fury blow,

And overboard the broken mast

        the stormy blasts do throw;

   The heavens large are clad

        with clouds as dark as hell,

And twice as high the striving waves

        begin to roar and swell;

   With greater dangers dread

        the men are vexéd more,

In greater peril of their life

        than they had been before.

PAI 18

The young Rhomeo then feeling himself

thus tossed with this new tempest, could not tell what

countenance to use, but was so surprised and changed with

these last flames, as he had almost forgotten himself,

PAI 85

This journey then fared like the voyages of

mariners, who after they have bene tost by great and troublous

tempest, seeing some sun beam pierce the heavens to lighten

the land, assure them selves again, and thinking to have

avoided shipwreck, and suddenly the seas begin to swell, the

waves do roar, with such vehemence and noise, as if they were

fallen again into greater danger than before.

 

 

Life as a see voyage

PAI 85

This journey then fared like the voyages of

mariners, who after they have bene tost by great and troublous

tempest, seeing some sun beam pierce the heavens to lighten

the land, assure them selves again, and thinking to have

avoided shipwreck, and suddenly the seas begin to swell, the

waves do roar, with such vehemence and noise, as if they were

fallen again into greater danger than before.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love as service

PAI 26

“Madame if the heavens have

bene so favourable to employ me to do you some agreeable

service being repaired hither by chance amongst other

gentlemen, I esteem the same well bestowed, craving no

greater benefit for satisfaction of all my contestations received

in this world, than to serve, obey, and honour you so long as

my life doth last, as experience shall yield more ample proof

when it shall please you to give further assay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love as a labyrinth

 

DP 12

                          Dall’altro canto la giovane poco ad altro ch’a lui

solo pensando dopo molti sospiri tra sé istimò lei dover

sempre felice essere, se costui per sposo avere potesse. Ma

per la nimistà che tra l’una e l’altra casa era, con molto timor

poco speme di giugnere a sì lieto grado tenea. Onde fra due

pensieri di continuo vivendo a sé stessa più volte disse: “O

sciocca me a qual vaghezza mi lascio io in così strano

labirinto guidare? Ove senza scorta restando uscire a mia

posta non ne potrò. Già che Romeo Montecchi non m’ama,

perciò che per la nimistà che ha co miei, altro che la mia

vergogna non può cercare. E posto che per sposa egli mi

volesse, il mio padre di darmegli non consentirebbe giamai.”

Dapoi nell’altro pensiero venendo dicea: “Chi sa forse che per

meglio paceficarsi insieme queste due case, che già stanche e

sazie sono di far tra lor guerra mi porria ancor venir fatto

d’averlo in quella guisa che io lo disio.” Et in questo fermatasi

cominciò esserli d’alcun sguardo cortese.

BAN 17

Entrato Romeo in questo vago laberinto, non avendo

ardire di spiare chi la giovane si fosse,

PAI 30

And after she had wondered of long

time in this amorous Labyrinth, she knew not whereupon to

resolve, but wept incessantly, and accused herself,

 

 

 

 

 

Love as consuming fire

DP 13

               Accesi dunque gli due amanti di ugual fuoco l’uno

dell’altro il bel nome, e l’effigie nel petto scolpita portando,

dier principio quando in chiesa, quando a qualche fenestra a

vagheggiarsi: in tanto che mai bene ne l’uno ne l’altro avea se

non quanto si vedeano

DP 100

                                                                 Al qual disse la donna:

“Padre altro non vi dimando che questa grazia, la quale per lo

amore, che voi alla felice memoria di costui portaste, e

mostrogli Romeo, mi farete volentieri, e questo fia, di non far

mai palese la nostra morte, accio che gli nostri corpi possano

insieme sempre in questo sepolcro stare, e se per caso il

morir nostro si risapesse, per lo già detto amore vi prego che

gli nostri miseri padri in nome de ambo noi vogliate pregare,

che quelli gli quali amore in uno istesso foco, e ad una istessa

morte arse e guidò; non sia loro grave in uno istesso sepolcro

lasciare.”

BAN 17

                                                                                            E così

l’amore che all’altra donna portava, vinto da questo nuovo, diede

luogo a queste fiamme che mai più dappoi se non per morte si

spensero.

PAI 6

But how much the young gentleman saw

her whist, and silent, the more he was inflamed, and after he

had continued certain months in that service without remedy

of his grief, he determined in the end to depart Verona, for

proof if by change of the place he might alter his affection,

saying to himself: “What doe I mean to love one that is so

unkind, and thus doth disdain me. I am all her own, and yet

she flieth from me. I can no longer live, except her presence I

doe enjoy. And she hath no contented mind, but when she is

furthest from me. I will then from henceforth estrange myself

from her, for it may so come to pass by not beholding her, that

this fire in me which takes increase and nourishment by her

fair eyes, by little and little may die and quench”.

PAI 10

And continued in this manner of life 2 or 3 months,

thinking by that means to quench the sparks of ancient flames

PAI 17

And feasting her incessantly

with piteous looks, the love which he bare to his first

gentlewoman was overcome with this new fire, which took

such nourishment and vigour in his heart, as he was not able

never to quench the same but by death only: as you may

understand by one of the strangest discourses, that ever any

mortal man devised

 

PAI 26

Moreover, if you

have received any heat by touch of my hand, you may be well

assured that those flames be dead in respect of the lively

sparks and violent fire which sorts from your fair eyes, which

fire hath so fiercely inflamed all the most sensible parts of my

body, as if I be not succoured by the favour of your good

graces, I doe attend the time to be consumed to dust”.

 

 

 

Love as sweet poison

BAN 17

beveva il dolce amoroso veleno, ogni parte ed ogni

gesto di quella meravigliosamente lodando.

 

 

 

 

Eye Beam

DP 10

                                                    Costui preso alquanto d’ardire

seguì, “Se io a voi con la mia mano la vostra riscaldo, voi co

begli occhi il mio core accendete.” La donna dopo un breve

sorriso schifando d’essere con lui veduta, o udita ragionare

ancora gli disse: “Io vi giuro Romeo per mia fé, che non è qui

donna, la quale (come voi siete) a gli occhi mei bella paia.”

Alla quale il giovane già tutto di lei acceso rispose: “Qual io

mi sia sarò alla vostra beltade (s’a quella non spiacerà) fedel

servo.”

BAN 19

e di tal maniera si guardavano che,

riscontrandosi talora gli occhi loro ed insieme mescolandosi i

focosi raggi della vista dell’uno e dell’altra, di leggero s’avvidero

che amorosamente si miravano

 

 

 

Lantern

DP 83

A questo accostatosi Romeo, che forse verso le quatro

ore potea essere, e come uomo di gran nerbo ch’egli era, per

forza il coperchio levatogli, e con certi legni che seco portati

avea in modo pontellato avendolo, che contra sua voglia

chiuder non si potea, dentro vi entrò, e lo rinchiuse. Avea

seco il sventurato giovane recata una lume orba per la sua

donna alquanto vedere, la quale rinchiuso nell’arca di subito

tirò fuori, e aperse.

BAN 132

Aveva Pietro, per commissione di Romeo, portato

seco una picciola lanternetta che altri chiamano ‘ceca’, altri

‘sorda’, la quale, scoperta, diede loro aita ad aprir l’arca e ben

puntellarla. Entrò dentro Romeo, e vide la carissima moglie che

invero pareva morta. Cadette subito Romeo tutto svenuto a lato

a Giulietta, di quella assai più morto, ed un pezzo stette fuor di

sé tanto dal dolore oppresso che fu vicino a morire. In sé poi

rivenuto, la carissima moglie abbracciò e più volte baciandola, di

caldissime lagrime lo smorto viso le bagnava e, dal dirotto pianto

impedito, non poteva formar parola. Egli pianse assai e poi disse

di molte parole che averebbero commosso a pietà i più ferrigni

animi del mondo.

 

Promised Faith

DP 107

Questo parve a ciascuno quasi

impossibile, e somma maraviglia a tutti apportò. Il che

udendo frate Lorenzo, e conoscendo non poter più

nascondere quello che disiava di celare, in genocchioni dinazi

al Signore postosi disse: “Perdonatemi Signore mio se a

vostra signoria la bugia di quello, che ella m’ha richiesto

dissi, che ciò non fu per malizia né per guadagno alcuno, ma

per servare la promessa fede a due miseri e morti amanti.” Et

così tutta la passata istoria fu astretto, presenti molti,

raccontargli.

BR 222

    As for the irons that

        were taken in my hand,

As now I deem, I need not seek

        to make ye understand

   To what use iron first

        was made, when it began;

How of itself it helpeth not,

        ne yet can help a man.

   The thing that hurteth is

        the malice of his will,

That such indifferent things is wont

        to use and order ill.

   Thus much I thought to say,

        to cause you so to know

That neither these my piteous tears,

        though ne’er so fast they flow,

   Ne yet these iron tools,

        nor the suspected time,

Can justly prove the murder done,

        or damn me of the crime:

   No one of these hath power,

        ne power have all the three,

To make me other than I am,

        how so I seem to be.

   But sure my conscience,

        if so my guilt deserve,

For an appeacher, witness, and

        a hangman, eke should serve;

   For through mine age, whose hairs

        of long time since were hoar,

And credit great that I was in,

        with you, in time tofore,

   And eke the sojourn short

        that I on earth must make,

That every day and hour do look

        my journey hence to take,

   My conscience inwardly

        should more torment me thrice,

Than all the outward deadly pain

        that all you could devise.

   But, God I praise, I feel

        no worm that gnaweth me,

And from remorse’s pricking sting

        I joy that I am free:

   I mean, as touching this,

        wherewith you troubled are,

Wherewith you should be troubled still,

        if I my speech should spare.

   But to the end I may

        set all your hearts at rest,

And pluck out all the scruples that

        are rooted in your breast,

   Which might perhaps henceforth,

        increasing more and more,

Within your conscience also

        increase your cureless sore,

   I swear by yonder heavens,

        whither I hope to climb,

And for a witness of my words

        my heart attesteth Him,

   Whose mighty hand doth wield

        them in their violent sway,

And on the rolling stormy seas

        the heavy earth doth stay,

   That I will make a short

        and eke a true discourse

Of this most woeful tragedy,

        and show both th’end and source

   Of their unhappy death,

        which you perchance no less

Will wonder at than they, alas,

        poor lovers in distress,

   Tormented much in mind,

        not forcing lively breath,

With strong and patient heart did

        yield themself to cruel death:

   Such was the mutual love

        wherein they burnéd both,

And of their promised friendship’s faith

        so steady was the troth.”

 

 

 

MOTIFS/THEMES

 

Frail unconstant Fortune

 

 

 

 

BR 128 (143-58)

    “My Juliet, my love,

        my only hope and care,

To you I purpose not as now

        with length of word declare

   The diverseness and eke

        the accidents so strange

Of frail unconstant Fortune, that

        delighteth still in change;

   Who in a moment heaves

        her friends up to the height

Of her swift-turning slippery wheel,

        then fleets her friendship straight.

   O wondrous change, even with

        the twinkling of an eye

Whom erst herself had rashly set

        in pleasant place so high,

   The same in great despite

        down headlong doth she throw,

And while she treads and spurneth at

        the lofty state laid low,

   More sorrow doth she shape

        within an hour’s space,

Than pleasure in an hundred years;

        so geason is her grace.

   The proof whereof in me,

        alas, too plain appears,

Whom tenderly my careful friends

        have fostered with my feres,

   In prosperous high degree,

        maintainéd so by fate,

That, as yourself did see, my foes

        envied my noble state.

 

BR 129 (1585-94)

   Yet such is my mishap,

        O cruel destiny,

That still I live, and wish for death,

        but yet can never die;

   So that just cause I have

        to think, as seemeth me,

That froward Fortune did of late

        with cruel Death agree

   To lengthen loathéd life,

        to pleasure in my pain,

And triumph in my harm, as in

        the greatest hopéd gain.

   And thou, the instrument

        of Fortune’s cruel will,

Without whose aid she can no way

        her tyrannous lust fulfil,

   Art not a whit ashamed,

        as far as I can see,

To cast me off, when thou hast culled

        the better part of me.

 

BR 130 (1667-72)

   For Fortune changeth more

        than fickle fantasy;

In nothing Fortune constant is

        save in unconstancy.

   Her hasty running wheel

        is of a restless course,

That turns the climbers headlong down,

        from better to the worse,

   And those that are beneath

        she heaveth up again:

So we shall rise to pleasure’s mount,

        out of the pit of pain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juliet’s cross-dressing

DP 38

Pure alla fine disse ella a lui: “Che

farò io sanza di voi? Di più vivere no mi dà il core, meglio fòra

che io con voi, ovunque ve ne andaste, mi venissi. Io

m’accorzarò queste chiome e come servo vi verrò dietro, né

d’altro meglio o più fedelmente che da me non potrete esser

servito.”

BAN 90

Io vorrei, padre mio, che voi mi

facessi ritrovar calze, giuppone, ed il resto delle vestimenta da

ragazzo, a ciò che vestita che io ne sia, possa la sera sul tardi, od

il matino a buonissim’ora, uscirmene di Verona che persona non

mi conoscerà, e me ne anderò di lungo a Mantova, e mi

ricovererò in casa del mio Romeo”.

BR

Receive me as thy servant, and

        the fellow of thy smart.

   Thy absence is my death,

        thy sight shall give me life;

But if perhaps thou stand in dread

        to lead me as a wife,

   Art thou all counsel-less?

        Canst thou no shift devise?

What letteth but in other

        weed I may myself disguise?

   What, shall I be the first?

        Hath none done so ere this,

To ’scape the bondage of their friends?

        Thyself can answer, yes.

   Or dost thou stand in doubt

        that I thy wife ne can

By service pleasure thee as much

        as may thy hiréd man?

   Or is my loyalty

        of both accompted less?

Perhaps thou fear’st lest I for gain

        forsake thee in distress.

   What, hath my beauty now

        no power at all on you,

Whose brightness, force, and praise, sometime

        up to the skies you blew?

   My tears, my friendship and

        my pleasures done of old,

Shall they be quite forgot indeed?”

PAI 88

And therefore if ever there lodged

any pity in the heart of Gentleman, I beseech thee Rhomeo

with all humility, that it may now find place in thee, and that

thou wilt vouchsafe to receive me for thy servant, and the

faithful companion of thy mishaps. And if thou think that thou

canst not conveniently receive me in the estate and habit of a

wife, who shall let me to change mine apparel? Shall I be the

first that have used like shifts, to escape the tyranny of

parents?

 

 

 

 

 

Romeo’s dressing as a nymph

DP 4

                                                           perché trattasi la maschera,

come ogni altro facea, e in abito di ninfa trovandosi, non fu

occhio ch’a rimirarlo non volgesse, sì per la sua bellezza che

quella d’ogni donna avanzava, che ivi fosse, agguagliava,

come per maraviglia che in quella casa, massimamente la

notte, fosse venuto,

 

 

 

 

Phoebus

 

 

 

 

 

NAMES (different names for the same characters)

 

Romeus’ man

DP

Pietro

BAN

Pietro

PAI

Petre/Pietro

 

 

The Franciscan brother

DP

Frate Lorenzo

BAN

Fra Lorenzo

PAI

Friar Laurence

 

 

 

Capulet

DP

Antonio Capelletti

BAN

Capelletti

PAI

Capellet

 

The gentleman dancing with Juliet (cold hands)

DP

Marcuccio

PAI

Mercutio

BAN

Marcuccio

 

 

 

AGE (different age for the same characters)

 

Juliet

DP 44

Onde prima che

più si consumi, diria che fusse bono di darle marito, che ogni

modo ella deciotto anni questa santa Eufemia fornì.

PAI 99

“Wife, I have many times thought upon that whereof

you speak, notwithstading sith as yet she is not attained to the

age of xviij yeares, I thought to provide a husband at leisure.

 

 

 

 

Romeo

BAN 15

I suoi nemici poi non gli ponevano così la mente come

forse avrebbero fatto se egli fosse stato di maggior etate

PAI 5

                                              In the time that these things were

a-doing, one of the family of Montesches called Rhomeo, of the

age of 20 or 21 years, the comeliest and best conditioned

Gentleman that was amongst the Veronian youth,

 

NARRATIVE/DRAMATIC CONTRACTIONS, EXPANSIONs, DISLOCATIONS

 

The encounter before the marriage (expansion found only in BAN)

BAN 37

                                                                   Venne il tempo della

Quadragesima e, per più sicurezza dei casi suoi, Giulietta si

deliberò fidarsi d’una sua vecchia che seco in camera dormiva, e

pigliata l’opportunità, tutta l’istoria del suo amore alla buona

vecchia scoperse. E quantunque la vecchia assai la sgridasse e

dissuadesse da cotal impresa, nondimeno nessuno profitto

facendo, condescese al voler di Giulietta, la quale tanto seppe dire

che indusse quella a portar una lettera a Romeo.

BAN 38

                                                                                     L’amante,

veduto quanto gli era scritto, si ritrovò il più lieto uomo del

mondo per ciò che quella gli scriveva, che alle cinque ore della

notte egli venisse a parlar alla finestra davanti al casale e portasse

seco una scala di corda.

BAN 39

                                                Aveva Romeo un suo fidatissimo

servidore del quale in cose di molta importanza più volte s’era

fidato e trovatolo sempre presto e leale. A costui, dettoli ciò che

far intendeva, diede la cura di trovar la scala di corda e, messo

 ordine al tutto, all’ora determinata se n’andò con Pietro, che così

il servidore aveva nome, al luogo ove trovò Giulietta che

l’aspettava.

BAN 40

                    La quale, come il conobbe, mandò giù lo spago che

apprestato aveva e su tirò la scala a quello attaccata e, con l’aiuto

della vecchia che seco era, la scala alla ferrata fermamente

accomandata, attendeva la salita dell’amante.

BAN 41

                                                                      Egli su arditamente

salì e Pietro dentro al casale si ricoverò. Salito Romeo sulla

finestra, che la ferrata aveva molto spessa e forte di modo ch’una

mano difficilmente passar vi poteva, si mise a parlar con

Giulietta.

BAN 42

             E date e ricevute le amorose salutazioni, così Giulietta

al suo amante disse: “Signor mio, a me vieppiù caro che la luce

degli occhi miei, io vi ci ho fatto venire per ciò che con mia madre

ho posto ordine andarmi a confessare venerdì prossimo che

viene, nell’ora della predicazione. Avvisatene fra Lorenzo, che

provveda del tutto”.

BAN 43

                               Romeo disse che già il frate era avvertito e

disposto di far quanto essi volevano. E ragionato buona pezza

tra loro dei loro amori, quanto tempo li parve, Romeo discese giù,

e distaccata la fune della corda, e quella presa, con Pietro si partì.

 

The cord ladder

BAN 38

                                                                                     L’amante,

veduto quanto gli era scritto, si ritrovò il più lieto uomo del

mondo per ciò che quella gli scriveva, che alle cinque ore della

notte egli venisse a parlar alla finestra davanti al casale e portasse

seco una scala di corda.

BAN 39

                                                Aveva Romeo un suo fidatissimo

servidore del quale in cose di molta importanza più volte s’era

fidato e trovatolo sempre presto e leale. A costui, dettoli ciò che

far intendeva, diede la cura di trovar la scala di corda e, messo

 ordine al tutto, all’ora determinata se n’andò con Pietro, che così

il servidore aveva nome, al luogo ove trovò Giulietta che

l’aspettava.

BOA 49

 

                                              Roméo pressé de se retirer, dit

secrètement à Juliette, qu’elle lui envoyât après le dîner la

vieille, et qu’il ferait faire une échelle de cordes, par laquelle (ce

soir même) il monterait en sa chambre par la fenêtre, où plus à

loisir ils aviseraient à leurs affaires.

PAI 49

Rhomeo sorry to go from Iulietta said

secretly unto her, that she should send unto him after diner

the old woman, and that he would cause to be made a corded

ladder the same evening, thereby to climb up to her chamber

window, where at more leisure they would devise of their

affairs.

BR 69

   Then Romeus said to her,

         both loth to part so soon,

“Fair lady, send to me again

         your nurse this afternoon.

   Of cord I will bespeak

         a ladder by that time;

By which, this night, while others sleep,

         I will your window climb.

   Then will we talk of love

         and of our old despairs,

And then, with longer leisure had,

         dispose our great affairs.”

R&J-Q2:19.e

ROMEO

And stay, good Nurse, behind the abbey wall,

Within this hour my man shall be with thee

And bring thee cords made like a tackled stair,

Which to the high topgallant of my joy,                  

Must be my convoy in the secret night.

Farewell; be trusty, and I’ll quit thy pains.

Farewell; commend me to thy mistress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Killing of Tybalt

DP 31

(Romeo kills Tybalt out

of rage)

pur alla fine sendo molti di suoi feriti, e quasi tutti

della strada cacciati vinto dalla ira sopra Tebaldo Capelletti

corso, che il più fiero de suoi nemici parea, di un colpo in

terra morto lo distese, e gli altri che già per la morte di costui

erano smarriti, in grandissima fuga rivolse.

BAN 59

(Tybalt attacks Romeo)

                                                                                          Queste

parole furono quasi da tutti udite, ma Tebaldo, o non intendesse

ciò che Romeo diceva o facesse vista di non intenderlo, rispose:

“Ah traditore, tu sei morto!” e con furia a dosso si gli avventò per

ferirlo sulla testa.

BAN 60

                            Romeo che aveva le maniche della maglia che

sempre portava, ed al braccio sinistro avvolta la cappa, se la pose

sovra il capo, e rivoltata la punta della spada verso il nemico

quello direttamente ferì nella gola e gliela passò di banda in

banda, di modo che Tebaldo subito si lasciò cascar boccone in

terra morto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference to the fictional source of the story

DP Frame

Aveva io per continuo uso cavalcando

di menar m­eco uno mio arcero omo di forse cinquant’anni

pratico nell’arte e piacevolissimo, e come quasi tutti que di

Verona (ove egli nacque) sono, parlante molto e chiamato

Peregrino. Questi oltra che animoso e esperto soldato fusse,

leggiadro e, forse più di quello ch’agli anni suoi si saria

convenuto, innamorato sempre si ritrovava, il che al suo

valore doppio valore aggiugneva. Onde le più belle novelle, e

con miglior ordine e grazia si dilettava di racontare, e

massimamente quelle che d’amore parlavano, ch’alcun altro,

ch’io udissi giamai. Per la qual cosa partendo io da Gradisca,

ove in allogiamenti mi stava, e con costui e due altri mei,

forse de Amore sospinto, verso Udine venendo, la qual strada

molto solinga, e tutta per la guerra arsa e destrutta in quel

tempo era, e molto dal pensiero soppresso e lontano dagli

altri venendomi, accostatomisi il detto Peregrino, come

quello che miei pensieri indovinava, così mi disse: “Volete voi

sempre in trista vita vivere? Perché una bella crudele,

altramente mostrando, poco vi ami? Et benché contro a me

spesso dica, pure perché meglio si danno, che non si

ritengono i consigli, vi dirò, patron mio, che oltra ch’a voi

nell’essercizio che siete, lo star molto nella prigion d’Amore

si disdica, si tristi son quasi tutti e fini a quali egli ci produce,

ch’è uno pericolo il seguirlo. Et in testimonianza di ciò,

quand’a voi piacesse, potre’ io una novella nella mia città

avenuta, che la strada men solitaria, e men rincrescevole ci

faria, raccontarvi: ne la quale sentireste come dui nobili

amanti a misera e piatosa morte guidati fossero.” Et già

avendo io fatto segno di udirlo volentieri, egli così cominciò.

BAN Dedication

Ora ragionandosi

un giorno dei casi fortunevoli, che nelle cose dell’amore, avversi

avvengono, il capitano Alessandro Peregrino narrò una pietosa

istoria,che in Verona, al tempo del signor Bartolomeo Scala,

avvenne: la quale per il suo infelice fine, quasi tutti ci fece

piangere. E perché mi parve degna di compassione, e d’esser

consacrata alla posterità, per ammonir i giovani che imparino

moderatamente a governarsi, e non correr a furia, la scrissi.

Quella dunque da me scritta, a voi mando e dono, conoscendo

per esperienza le ciancie mie esservi grate e che volentieri

quelle leggete. I

BR 170

The wooer hath passed forth

        the first day in this sort,

And many other more than this,

        in pleasure and disport.

   At length the wishéd time

        of long hopéd delight,

As Paris thought, drew near;

        but near approachéd heavy plight.

   Against the bridal day

        the parents did prepare

Such rich attire, such furniture,

        such store of dainty fare,

   That they which did behold

        the same the night before

Did think and say, a man could scarcely

        wish for any more.

   Nothing did seem too dear;

        the dearest things were bought;

And, as the written story saith,

        indeed there wanted nought

   That ’longed to his degree,

     and honour of his stock;

 

 

Fortune

DP 28

                                                                         Et così stando

intervenne che la fortuna d’ogni mondan diletto nemica, non

so qual malvagio seme spargendo, fece tra le loro case la già

quasi morta nimistà riverdire,

NO BAN

 

BR 83

But who is he that can

         his present state assure?

And say unto himself, thy joys

         shall yet a day endure?

   So wavering Fortune’s wheel,

         her changes be so strange;

 

 

Death of Juliet

DP 102

                              Et detto questo la sua gran sciagura

nell’animo recatasi e la perdita del caro amante ricordandosi

diliberando di più no vivere raccolto a sé il fiato e alquanto

tenutolo, e poscia con un gran grido fuori mandando sopra’l

morto corpo morta si rese.

BAN 153

Ella a modo veruno non voleva ascoltarlo ma, nel suo fiero

proponimento perseverando, si doleva che non potesse con la

vita sua ricuperar quella del suo Romeo. Et in tutto si dispose

voler morire. Ristretti adunque in sé gli spirti, con il suo Romeo

in grembo, senza dir nulla, se ne morì.

BOA 170

Et ayant tiré la dague que Roméo avait ceinte à son

côté se donna de la pointe plusieurs coups au travers du cœur,

disant d’une voix foible et piteuse:  “Ah mort fin de malheur, et

commencement de félicité, tu sois la bienvenue. Ne crains à

cette heure de me darder, et ne donne aucune dilation à ma vie,

de peur que mon esprit ne travaille à trouver celui de mon

Roméo, entre tant de morts. Et toi mon cher seigneur et loyal

époux Roméo, s’il te reste encore quelque connaissance, reçois

celle que tu as si loyaument aimée, et qui a été cause de ta

violente mort, laquelle t’offre volontairement son âme, afin

qu’autre que toi ne soit jouissant de l’amour que si justement

avais conquis. Et afin que nos esprits, sortant de cette lumière,

soient éternellement vivant ensemble, au lieu d’éternelle

immortalité.” Et ces propos achevés, elle rendit l’esprit.

 

 

 

 

 

Meeting before Romeo’s departure

DP 35

                              Dall’altra parte al giovane per lei sola

abbandonare il partirsi dalla sua patria dolea, né

volendosene per cosa alcuna partire senza torre da lei

lagrimevole combiato, e in casa sua andare non potendo, al

frate ricorse.

DP 36

                         Al quale che ella venire dovesse per uno servo

del suo padre molto amico di Romeo fu fatto a sapere.

DP 37

                                                                                             Et ella

vi si ridusse. Et andati amen due nel confessoro assai la loro

sciagura insieme piansero.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sequence of the events in the ending

DP

BAN

BR

BOA

PAI

Q1

Q2

 

103. The watchmen of the town find the friars on the

Cappelletti’s grave and ask them what they are doing.

The friars refuse to answer and the watchmen’s chief

says he’ll report to Bartolomeo

154; 155

219

 

171

171

 

47.b

 

104. The Cappelletti are informed that friar Lorenzo was

found on Giulietta’s grave and ask Bartolomeo to investigate

 155

220

 

 172

 172

 

47.c

 

105. Bartolomeo summons Friar Lorenzo and interrogates him.

The friar lies.

 

221

173

173

 

48.a

 

106. Some friars, who hate friar Lorenzo, open the grave,

find Romeo’s body and inform everyone

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

107. Friar Lorenzo finally tells the truth

 

222

 174

174

 

48.b

48.c

 

108. Bartolomeo and many people go to San Francesco

to see the lovers’ bodies, exhibited on two carpets

 156

220; 221

173

173

 

  

109. The two lovers’ fathers arrive and cry their children’s

death. The feud is ended

 159

226

 

178

178

 

49.c

 
         

 

 

 

Romeo’s death

DP 97

 (Friar Laurence sees

 the dying Romeo)

O Padre mio o

padre mio ben mandaste la lettera? Ben sarò io maritata?

Ben mi guidarete a Romeo? Vedetelo quì nel mio grembo già

morto.” E raccontandogli tutto il fatto a lui il mostrò.

             Frate Lorenzo queste cose sentendo come insensato si

stava; e mirando il giovane, il quale per passare di questa

all’altra vita era, così dicendo: “O Romeo qual sciagura mi

t’ha tolto? Parlami alquanto? Drizza a me un poco gli occhi

tuoi? O Romeo vedi la tua carissima Giulietta che ti prega che

la miri; perché non rispondi? Almeno a lei, nel cui bel grembo

tu giacci?”

BAN 147

 (Friar Laurence sees

 the dying Romeo)

Io la mandai”

– rispose il frate – “e la portò frate Anselmo, che pur tu conosci.

E perché mi dici tu cotesto?”. Piangendo acerbamente, Giulietta:

“Salite su” – disse – “e lo vederete”. Salì il frate e vide Romeo

giacersi, che poco più di vita aveva, e disse: “Romeo, figliuol mio,

che hai?”.

 

BR 211

(when the Friar arrives

Romeo has already

died)

   Then both they entered in,

        where they, alas, did find

The breathless corpse of Romeus,

        forsaken of the mind:

   Where they have made such moan,

        as they may best conceive,

That have with perfect friendship loved,

        whose friend fierce death did reave.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

DIFFERENT CHARACTERS PERFORMING THE SAME ACTIONS

Seeing and falling in love

DP 5

(Juliet falls in love)

                                    ma con più efficacia che ad alcun altro, ad

una figliola del detto Messer Antonio venne veduto, che egli

sola avea. La quale di sopra naturale bellezza e baldanzosa e

legiadrissima era. Questa veduto il giovane con tanta forza

nell’animo la sua bellezza ricevette: che al primo incontro de

loro occhi di più non essere di lei stessa le parve.

BAN 18

(Juliet falls in love)

  Egli, come già dissi,

era in un canto assiso, nel qual luogo quando si ballava tutti gli

passavano per dinanzi. Giulietta – che così aveva nome la

garzona che cotanto a Romeo piaceva – era figliuola del padrone

della casa e della festa. Non conoscendo anco ella Romeo, ma

parendole pure il più bello e leggiadro giovine che trovar si

potesse, meravigliosamente della vista s’appagava, e dolcemente

e furtivamente talora così, sotto occhio mirandolo, sentiva non

so che dolcezza al core che tutta di gioioso ed estremo piacere

l’ingombrava.

BOA 16 (Romeo)

Au moyen de quoi avec toute liberté il

pouvait contempler les dames à son aise, ce qu’il sut si bien

faire, et de si bonne grâce qu’il n’y avait celle qui ne reçût

quelque plaisir de sa présence. Et après avoir assis un jugement

particulier sur l’excellence de chacune, selon que l’affection le

conduisait, il avisa une fille entre autres d’une extrême beauté,

laquelle encore qu’il ne l’eût jamais vue, elle lui plut sur toutes

et lui donnait en son cœur le premier lieu en toute perfection

de beauté.

BR 19 (Romeo)

At length he saw a maid,

         right fair, of perfect shape,

Which Theseus or Paris would

         have chosen to their rape.

   Whom erst he never saw;

         of all she pleased him most;

Within himself he said to her,

          “Thou justly may’st thee boast

   Of perfect shape’s renown,

         and beauty’s sounding praise,

Whose like ne hath, ne shall be seen,

         ne liveth in our days.”

 

Marriage as peace

DP 12 (Juliet’s idea)

E posto che per sposa egli mi

volesse, il mio padre di darmegli non consentirebbe giamai.”

Dapoi nell’altro pensiero venendo dicea: “Chi sa forse che per

meglio paceficarsi insieme queste due case, che già stanche e

sazie sono di far tra lor guerra mi porria ancor venir fatto

d’averlo in quella guisa che io lo disio.” Et in questo fermatasi

cominciò esserli d’alcun sguardo cortese.

DP 22

(Friar Laurence

celebrates the marriage

for his own profit)

                                                          Il frate di ciò contento fu, si

perché a Romeo niuna cosa arìa senza suo gran danno potuta

negare, sì anco perché pensava, che forse ancora per mezzo

suo sarìa questa cosa succeduta in bene, il che di molto onore

gli sarìa stato presso il Signore, e ogn’altro ch’avesse disiato

queste due case veder in pace.

BAN 35 (Friar Laurence)

                                                                        Fra Lorenzo, udito

questo, promise far tutto ciò che Romeo voleva, sì perché a quello

non poteva cosa veruna negare ed altresì che con questo mezzo

si persuadeva poter pacificare insieme i Capelletti ed i

Montecchi, ed acquistarsi di più in più la grazia del signor

Bartolomeo, che infinitamente desiderava che queste due casate

facessero pace per levar tutti i tumulti della sua città.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asking the friar to celebrate the marriage

DP 19 (Juliet)

“Facciasi” rispose la donna: “Ma reintegrasi poi nella

presenza di frate Lorenzo da San Francesco mio confessore

se volete che io in tutto e contenta mi vi dia.” “O” disse a lei

Romeo “dunque frate Lorenzo da Reggio è quello, che ogni

secreto de cuor vostro sa?” “Sì” diss’ella, “e serbasi per mia

sodisfazione a far ogni nostra cosa dinanzi a lui.” Et qui

posto discreto modo alle loro cose l’uno dall’altro si partì.

 

BAN 32 (Juliet)

Romeo, che altro non bramava,

udendo queste parole lietamente le rispose che questo era tutto

il suo disio e che ogni volta che le piacesse la sposeria in quel odo

che ella ordinasse. “Ora sta bene” – soggiunse Giulietta – “ma

perché le cose nostre ordinatamente si facciano, io vorrei che il

nostro sposalizio alla presenza del reverendo frate Lorenzo da

Reggio, mio padre spirituale, si facesse”. A questo s’accordarono,

e si conchiuse che Romeo con lui il seguente giorno del fatto

parlasse, essendo egli molto di quello domestico.

BOA 37 (Romeo)

 

BR 48 (Romeo)

   Then Romeus, whose thought

         was free from foul desire,

And to the top of virtue’s height

         did worthily aspire,

   Was filled with greater joy

         than can my pen express,

Or, till they have enjoyed the like,

         the hearer’s heart can guess.

   And then with joined hands,

         heaved up into the skies,

He thanks the Gods, and from the heavens

         for vengeance down he cries

   If he have other thought

         but as his lady spake;

And then his look he turned to her,

         and thus did answer make:

    “Since, lady, that you like

         to honour me so much

As to accept me for your spouse,

         I yield myself for such.

   In true witness whereof,

         because I must depart,

Till that my deed do prove my word,

         I leave in pawn my heart.

   To-morrow eke betimes

         before the sun arise,

To Friar Laurence will I wend,

         to learn his sage advice.

   He is my ghostly sire,

         and oft he hath me taught

What I should do in things of weight,

         when I his aid have sought.

   And at this self-same hour,

         I plight you here my faith,

I will be here, if you think good,

         to tell you what he saith.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The friar tries to dissuade Romeo from marrying Juliet (Innovation from BOA)

BOA 41

                                                         , auquel le bon homme après

lui avoir fait plusieurs remontrances, et proposé tous les

inconvénients de ce mariage clandestin, l’exhorta d’y penser

plus à loisir.

BR 52

A thousand doubts and moe

         in th’old man’s head arose,

A thousand dangers like to come

         the old man doth disclose,

   And from the spousal rites

         he redeth him refrain,

Perhaps he shall be bet advised

      within a week or twain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organiser of the lovers’ encounter

BAN 38 (Juliet)

                                                                                     L’amante,

veduto quanto gli era scritto, si ritrovò il più lieto uomo del

mondo per ciò che quella gli scriveva, che alle cinque ore della

notte egli venisse a parlar alla finestra davanti al casale e portasse

seco una scala di corda.

BOA 49 (Romeo)

Roméo pressé de se retirer, dit

secrètement à Juliette, qu’elle lui envoyât après le dîner la

vieille, et qu’il ferait faire une échelle de cordes, par laquelle (ce

soir même) il monterait en sa chambre par la fenêtre, où plus à

loisir ils aviseraient à leurs affaires.

 

BR 69 (Romeo)

   Then Romeus said to her,

         both loth to part so soon,

“Fair lady, send to me again

         your nurse this afternoon.

   Of cord I will bespeak

         a ladder by that time;

By which, this night, while others sleep,

         I will your window climb.

   Then will we talk of love

         and of our old despairs,

And then, with longer leisure had,

         dispose our great affairs.”

 

 

 

 

 

Inverted functions

 

BAN 38

(Juliet informs Romeo

via the nurse)

L’amante,

veduto quanto gli era scritto, si ritrovò il più lieto uomo del

mondo per ciò che quella gli scriveva, che alle cinque ore della

notte egli venisse a parlar alla finestra davanti al casale e portasse

seco una scala di corda.

R&J Q2: 19.e

(Romeo informs Juliet

via the nurse)

NURSE  I pray you, sir, what saucy merchant was this that

was so full of his ropery?

ROMEO  A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk,

and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a

month.

NURSE  An a speak anything against me, I’ll take him down,

an a were lustier than he is, and twenty such jacks; and if I

cannot, I’ll find those that shall. Scurvy knave, I am none of

his flirt-gills, I am none of his skains-mates. [to her man] And thou must stand by too and suffer every knave to use

me at his pleasure.

PETER  I saw no man use you at his pleasure. If I had, my

weapon should quickly have been out. I warrant you, I dare

draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion in a good

quarrel, and the law on my side.

NURSE  Now afore God, I am so vexed, that every part about

me quivers. Scurvy knave! Pray you, sir, a word. And, as I

told you, my young lady bid me enquire you out. What she

bid me say, I will keep to myself. But first let me tell ye, if ye

should lead her in a fool’s paradise, as they say, it were a

very gross kind of behaviour, as they say. For the

gentlewoman is young; and therefore, if you should deal

double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any

gentlewoman, and very weak dealing.

ROMEO  Nurse, commend me to thy lady and mistress, I

protest unto thee –

NURSE  Good heart, and i’faith I will tell her as much. Lord,

lord, she will be a joyful woman.

ROMEO  What wilt thou tell her, Nurse? Thou dost not mark

me.

NURSE  I will tell her, sir, that you do protest, which, as I

take it, is a gentlemanlike offer.

ROMEO

Bid her devise some means to come to shrift this afternoon,

And there she shall at Friar Laurence’ cell

Be shrived and married. Here is for thy pains.

NURSE  No, truly, sir, not a penny.

ROMEO  Go to, I say you shall.

NURSE

This afternoon, sir? Well, she shall be there.

ROMEO

And stay, good Nurse, behind the abbey wall,

Within this hour my man shall be with thee

And bring thee cords made like a tackled stair,

Which to the high topgallant of my joy,

Must be my convoy in the secret night.

Farewell; be trusty, and I’ll quit thy pains.

Farewell; commend me to thy mistress.

NURSE

Now God in heaven bless thee! Hark you, sir.

ROMEO

What sayst thou my dear Nurse?

NURSE

Is your man secret? Did you ne’er here say

“Two may keep counsel, putting one away”?

ROMEO

Warrant thee, my man’s as true as steel.

NURSE  Well sir, my mistress is the sweetest lady. Lord,

Lord! when ’twas a little prating thing – Oh, there is a

nobleman in town, one Paris, That would fain lay knife

aboard, but she, good soul, had as lief see a toad, a very toad,

as see him. I anger her sometimes and tell her that Paris is

the properer man, but I’ll warrant you, when I say so, she

looks as pale as any clout in the versal world. Doth not

rosemary and Romeo begin both with a letter?

ROMEO  Ay Nurse, what of that? Both with an “R”.

NURSE  Ah, mocker, that’s the dog’s name. “R” is for the –

no, I know it begins with some other letter, and she hath the

prettiest sententious of it, of you and rosemary, that it would

do you good to hear it.

ROMEO  Commend me to thy lady.

NURSE  Ay, a thousand times. – Peter!

PETER  Anon.

NURSE  Before and apace.                                     [Exeuntt.]

 

[R&J-Q2: 20.c]

 

JULIET

Now good sweet Nurse – O Lord, why lookest thou sad?

Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;

If good, thou shamest the music of sweet news

By playing it to me with so sour a face.

NURSE

I am aweary, give me leave a while.

Fie, how my bones ache! What a jaunce have I!

JULIET

I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news.

Nay come, I pray thee, speak, good good Nurse, speak.

NURSE

Jesu, what haste! Can you not stay awhile?

Do you not see that I am out of breath?

JULIET

How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath

To say to me that thou art out of breath?

The excuse that thou dost make in this delay

Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.

Is thy news good or bad? Answer to that,

Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.

Let me be satisfied; is’t good or bad?

NURSE

Well, you have made a simple choice. You know not how to

choose a man. Romeo? No, not he, though his face be better

then any man’s, yet his leg excels all men’s, and for a hand

and a foot and a body, though they be not to be talked on,

yet they are past compare. He is not the flower of courtesy,

but I’ll warrant him, as gentle as a lamb. Go thy ways,

wench, serve God. What, have you dined at home?

JULIET

No, no. But all this did I know before.

What says he of our marriage, what of that?

NURSE

Lord how my head aches! what a head have I!

It beats as it would fall in twenty pieces.

My back o’ t’other side, ah, my back, my back!

Beshrew your heart for sending me about

To catch my death with jauncing up and down.

JULIET

I’faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.

Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me what says my love?

NURSE

Your love says, like an honest gentleman,

And a courteous, and a kind, and a handsome,

And, I warrant, a virtuous – Where is your mother?

JULIET

Where is my mother? Why, she is within.

Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest:

“Your love says, like an honest gentleman,

Where is your mother?”

NURSE                         O God’s lady dear,

Are you so hot? Marry come up, I trow.

Is this the poultice for my aching bones?

Henceforward do your messages yourself.

JULIET

Here’s such a coil. Come, what says Romeo?

NURSE

Have you got leave to go to shrift today?

JULIET  I have.

NURSE

Then high you hence to Friar Laurence’ cell,

There stays a husband to make you a wife.

Now comes the wanton blood up in your cheeks;

They’ll be in scarlet straight at any news.

Hie you to church. I must another way,

To fetch a ladder by the which your love

Must climb a bird’s nest soon when it is dark.

I am the drudge and toil in your delight,

But you shall bear the burden soon at night.

Go. I’ll to dinner. Hie you to the cell.

JULIET

Hie to high fortune! Honest Nurse, farewell.             Exeunt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE LOVER’S FIRST ENCOUNTER

 

DP 6 

(They dance together)

                                                                         Et passando la

mezzanotte, e il fine del festeggiare venendo, il ballo del

torchio o del cappello, come dire lo vogliamo, e che ancora

nel fine delle feste veggiamo usarsi, s’incominciò. Nel quale

in cerchio standosi, l’omo la donna e la donna l’uomo a sua

voglia permutandosi, piglia. In questa danza d’alcuna donna

fu il giovane levato, e a caso appresso la già innamorata

fanciulla posto.

DP 7

                               Era dall’altro canto di lei un nobile giovane

Marcuccio Guertio nominato, il quale per natura così il luglio

come il genaio le mani sempre freddissime avea. Perché

giunto Romeo Montecchi, che così era il giovane chiamato, al

manco lato della donna e come in tal ballo se usa, la bella sua

mano in mano presa, disse a lui quasi subito la giovane, forse

vaga d’udirlo favellare:

BAN 20 (Dance)

                                                                          Ora stando eglino

in questo vagheggiamento, venne il fine della festa del ballare e

si cominciò a far la danza, ossia il ballo del Torchio, che altri

dicono il ballo del Cappello. Facendosi questo giuoco fu Romeo

levato da una donna, il quale entrato in ballo fece il dover suo e,

dato il torchio ad una donna, andò presso a Giulietta, che così

richiedeva l’ordine, e quella prese per mano con piacer

inestimabile di tutte due le parti.

BAN 21

                                                         Restava Giulietta in mezzo a

Romeo ed a uno chiamato Marcuccio il Guercio, che era uomo di

corte molto piacevole e generalmente molto ben visto per i suoi

motti festevoli e per le piacevolezze che egli sapeva fare, perciò

che sempre aveva alcuna novelluccia per le mani da far ridere la

brigata e troppo volentieri, senza danno di nessuno, si sollazzava.

Aveva poi sempre il verno e la state, e da tutti i tempi, le mani

via più fredde e più gelate che un freddissimo ghiaccio alpino. E

tutto che buona pezza scaldandole al fuoco se ne stesse,

restavano perciò sempre freddissime.

BOA 22 

(Only Juliet 

dances)

 

                                          Amour ayant fait cette brèche au

cœur de ces amants, ainsi qu’ils cherchaient tous deux les

moyens de parler ensemble, fortune leur en apprêta une

prompte occasion, car quelque seigneur de la troupe prit

Juliette par la main pour la faire danser au bal de la torche,

duquel elle se sut si bien acquitter, et de si bonne grâce, qu’elle

gagna pour ce jour le prix d’honneur entre toutes les filles de

Vérone.

BOA 23 (The lovers sit)

              Roméo ayant prévu le lieu où elle se devait retirer, fit

ses approches, et sut si discrètement conduire ses affaires qu’il

eut le moyen à son retour d’être auprès d’elle. Juliette le bal fini

retourna au même lieu duquel elle était partie auparavant, et

demeura assise entre Roméo, et un autre appelé Marcucio,

courtisan fort aimé de tous, lequel à cause de ses facéties et

gentillesses était bien reçu en toutes compagnies.

BR 24 (Juliet dances)

   When thus in both their hearts

         had Cupid made his breach

And each of them had sought the mean

         to end the war by speech,

   Dame Fortune did assent

         their purpose to advance,

With torch in hand a comely knight

         did fetch her forth to dance;

   She quit herself so well,

         and with so trim a grace,

That she the chief praise won that night

         from all Verona race.

BR 25 (Sitting)

   The whilst our Romeus

         a place had warely won,

Nigh to the seat where she must sit,

         the dance once being done.

   Fair Juliet turned to

         her chair with pleasant cheer,

And glad she was her Romeus

         approachéd was so near.

   At th’one side of her chair

         her lover Romeo,

And on the other side there sat

         one called Mercutio;

   A courtier that each where

         was highly had in price,

For he was courteous of his speech,

         and pleasant of device.

   Even as a lion would

         among the lambs be bold,

Such was among the bashful maids

         Mercutio to behold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTER/TEXTAUL CRUCES

 

 

Being Hateful to Oneself

DP 73 (531,532)

E tu gran padre del cielo, poi che sì

tosto come vorei, non posso morire con la tua saetta togli me,

a me stessa odiosa.” Così essendo d’alcuna donna sollevata, e

sopra il suo letto posta, e da altre con assai parole confortata

non restava di piangere e dolersi.  

R&J 17.c (55)

My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself

BOA 88 (730)?

je me suis faite ennemie de moi-même

 

 

Crossed arms

 

DP 68

come s’avesse

creduto morire così compose sopra quello il corpo suo

meglio che ella seppe, e le mani sopra il suo bel petto poste in

croce aspettava ch’el beveraggio operasse, il quale poco oltra

a due ore stette a renderla come morta.

BOA 136

Et sentant que ses forces se diminuaient

peu à peu, et craignant que, par trop grande débilité, elle ne pût

exécuter son entreprise, comme furieuse et forcenée sans y

penser plus avant, elle engloutit l’eau contenue en sa fiole, puis

croisant ses bras sur son estomac, perdit à l’instant tous les

sentiments du corps et demeura en extase.

PAI 136

like a furious and insensate woman, without

further care, gulped up the water within the vial, then crossing

her arms upon her stomach, she lost at that instant all the

powers of her body, resting in a trance.

BR 181

And up she drank the mixture quite,

        withouten farther thought.

   Then on her breast she crossed

        her arms long and small,

And so, her senses failing her,

   into a trance did fall.