SENS

Shakespeare’s Narrative Sources: Italian Novellas and Their European Dissemination

English Glossary

 

A (pron.)[Brooke 1562]
OED 1933: he, it.
ACCOMPT[Brooke 1562: accompt, account]
LEME  Rastell 1525, Thomas 1550,
AGHAST[Brooke 1562]
ANCIENT[Brooke 1562]
ANNOY[Brooke 1562]
OED: 1.a. A mental state akin to pain arising from the involuntary reception of impressions, or subjection to circumstances, which one dislikes; disturbed or ruffled feeling; discomfort, vexation, trouble. In earlier times often = modern French ennui; in later usage expressing more active feeling of discomfort.
ANON[Brooke 1562]
APACE[Brooke 1562]
APAID[Brooke 1562]
APPPEACH[Brooke 1562: appeacher]
ARRAY[Brooke 1562]
ASSAY[Brooke 1562]
ASTONE[Brooke 1562]
OED: v. 1. transitive. To stun; to strike senseless with a blow, or partially senseless with a loud noise; to paralyse a limb with anæsthetics; to paralyse action, strike powerless, stupefy. (Obsolete.)
AT BAY[Brooke 1562]
ATTAIN (v., 2)[Brooke 1562: attaint 2270]
ATTAIN[Brooke 1562: 2846]
OED: v., transitive †3. To catch or detect in an offence, convict, condemn, attaint n. (Obsolete.)  [Common sense of Old French ateindre: compare Britton i. xxvii. §1 La forme de atteyndre   nostre pes enfreynte. ‘The manner of convicting   offenders for breach of our peace’].
ATTAIN TO[Brooke 1562: 2126]
OED: v., III. intransitive. 12. a. To reach, or arrive at, a state, condition, purpose, possession; to succeed in reaching.
AUGHT (pron.)[Brooke 1562]
AUGHT (adv.)[Brooke 1562: 1272]
AYE (adv.)[Brooke 1562]
BAIT (v. archaic)[Brooke 1562]
BANE (n. 2)[Brooke 1562]
BASHFUL[Brooke 1562]
BEAM[Brooke 1562: 195, 240]
OED: n. 21. figurative. Ray, gleam, emanation: beam of sight, a glance (also eye-beam n.) 
BEAR (v. 2)[Brooke 1562: bear, bare]
BESIEGE[Brooke 1562: besiegen]
BETIME[Brooke 1562]
BETOSS[Brooke 1562: betost]
BIN (BE)[Brooke 1562]
BEDECK[Brooke 1562]
BEFALL[Brooke 1562]
BEFILE[Brooke 1562]
 OED: v., transitive. To make foul or dirty; to defile. (Obsolete.)
BEGUILE[Brooke 1562]
BEHEST[Brooke 1562]
BEHOVE[Brooke 1562]
BELDAME[Brooke 1562]
BEREFT[Brooke 1562]
BESEECH[Brooke 1562: beseek]
BESEEM[Brooke 1562]
BESIDES[Brooke 1562: beside 2354]
  OED: prep. B. 3. Other than, else than: in negative and interrogative (formerly sometimes in affirmative) sentences, capable of being rendered by ‘except, excluding’.
BESPEAK[Brooke 1562]
OED: 5.a. To speak for; to arrange for, engage beforehand; to ‘order’ (goods).
BESPRENT[Brooke 1562]
BESTOW (v., 2)[Brooke 1562: 1273]
BESTRIDE[Brooke 1562]
BET (adv.)[Brooke 1562]
OED: better (Obsolete.)
BETAKE[Brooke 1562]
BETIDE[Brooke 1562]
BETIMES[Brooke 1562]
BEWEEP[Brooke 1562]
BEWRAY[Brooke 1562]
BID (v., 2b)[Brooke 1562: bidden]
BIT (n.1, 2)[Brooke 1562]
BLAST[Brooke 1562]
BLEAR[Brooke 1562]
BLESS[Brooke 1562: bless, bliss]
BLIN[Brooke 1562]
 OED: 1. a. intransitive. To cease, leave off, desist. (Obsolete.)
BOISTEROUS[Brooke 1562]
BOLSTER[Brooke 1562]
BOOT[Brooke 1562]
BOOTLESS[Brooke 1562]
BOWER[Brooke 1562]
BRACKISH[Brooke 1562]
BRAKE[Brooke 1562: brakes]
OED: n.2,  A clump of bushes, brushwood, or briers; a thicket.
BRAND[Brooke 1562]
BRAVE (adj., 2-3)[Brooke 1562]
BREW (v., 2)[Brooke 1562]
BRICKLE[Brooke 1562]
BRIDLE[Brooke 1562]
BRAST[Brooke 1562]
BRUIT[Brooke 1562]
CAMP (n. 1)[Brooke 1562]
CHAFE (v. 2)[Brooke 1562]
CAITIFF[Brooke 1562]
CASTAWAY[Brooke 1562]
CHURLISH[Brooke 1562]
CITE (v., 1)[Brooke 1562]
CLAD[Brooke 1562]
CLAP (v.)[Brooke 1562]
CLEPE[Brooke 1562]
CLOSE (adj. 14)[Brooke 1562: 2336]
COMELY[Brooke 1562]
CONDUIT[Brooke 1562]
COVETISE[Brooke 1562]
COWER[Brooke 1562]
CREST (n., 1)[Brooke 1562: creast]
CULL[Brooke 1562]
CURIOUS (adj., 3 archaic)[Brooke 1562]
DAINTY[Brooke 1562]
DAMAGE[Brooke 1562: domage]
DAW[Brooke 1562]
OED: v. 1,  3. transitive. To rouse or awaken from sleep or a swoon; to revive, ‘bring to’; = adaw.

DEFAME

[Brooke 1562]

DEFILE

[Brooke 1562]

DEPOSE (v., 3c)

[Brooke 1562]

DESART

[Brooke 1562]

OED: n. 1. Deserving; the becoming worthy of recompense, i.e. of reward or punishment, according to the good or ill of character or conduct; worthiness of recompense, merit or demerit.

DESCRY

[Brooke 1562]

DISEASE (n. 2, obsolete v. trouble )

[Brooke 1562]

DESERT (n. 2)

[Brooke 1562]

DESPITE

[Brooke 1562]

DESPOIL

[Brooke 1562]

DIGHT

[Brooke 1562]

DISAPPOINT

[Brooke 1562: 2943]

 OED: v., II. b. transitive. To thwart, frustrate, or foil (an aim, undertaking, objective, etc.); to prevent the realization of (a hope, intention, etc.); to fail to fulfil (an expectation).

DISDAIN

[Brooke 1562]

DISPORT

[Brooke 1562]

DISPREAD

[Brooke 1562]

DISTAIN

[Brooke 1562]

DISTRAIN

[Brooke 1562]

DOOM

[Brooke 1562]

DOUGH

[Brooke 1562]

DOZEN

[Brooke 1562: dosyn]

DRIFT

[Brooke 1562]

OED: 5. A scheme, plot, design, device. (Obsolete.)

DURST

[Brooke 1562]

EARNEST (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

EARNEST (n.)

[Brooke 1562: 1340]

OED: n.1. 2. Ardour in battle; (more widely) intense passion or desire. (Obsolete.)

EARTH (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

OED: 1. a. transitive. Originally Scottish. To bury (a corpse); also with up. In later use poetic or British regional.

ECLIPSE (v.)

[Brooke 1562: y-clipsed]

ENCLOSE

[Brooke 1562: inclose]

ETF

[Brooke 1562]

OED: adv. A second time, again; back.

EFTSOONS

[Brooke 1562]

EKE

[Brooke 1562]

ELSE (adv., 2)

[Brooke 1562: 616; 2,822]

ENTHRALL

[Brooke 1562]

ERE

[Brooke 1562]

ERST

[Brooke 1562]

ESPY

[Brooke 1562]

EYNE

[Brooke 1562]

EVEN (adv., 2)

[Brooke 1562]

EWER

[Brooke 1562]

FAIN

[Brooke 1562]

FARE  (n., 2)

[Brooke 1562: 2282]

FAST (adv., 6)

[Brooke 1562: 2763]

 

 

FEAT (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

FELL (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

FERE

[Brooke 1562]

FETCH (v., 3c)

[Brooke 1562: fet]

FILE (v. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

FLAW (n. 2)

[Brooke 1562]

FLEET (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

FOE

[Brooke 1562: fone]

FOLD

[Brooke 1562]

FORBEAR (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

FORBODE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: v. = forbid (Obsolete, rare.)

FORCE

[Brooke 1562: 860]

OED: II. 14 †(c) with infinitive as object. To care to, think it of consequence, or worth while to. Also, to hesitate, scruple. (Obsolete.)

FORDONE

[Brooke 1562]

FORLEASE

[Brooke 1562: 1204 forlorn]

 OED: v. 3. To leave, abandon, desert, forsake.

FOREPAST

[Brooke 1562]

FORESTOP

[Brooke 1562]

OED: v. 1. transitive. To stop up in front. (Obsolete.)

FORSAKE

[Brooke 1562, 171]

OED: v., 2. b. To decline or refuse to bear, encounter, have to do with, undertake; to avoid, shun. (Obsolete.)

FORSWEAR

[Brooke 1562]

FORSOOTH

[Brooke 1562]

FORTHWITH

[Brooke 1562]

FORWARD (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

FRAUGHT (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

FRAY (n. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

FRAY (v. 2)

[Brooke 1562: 911, 2742]

FROWARD

[Brooke 1562]

GAGE

[Brooke 1562]

GAIT

[Brooke 1562]

GEAR

[Brooke 1562]

GEASON

[Brooke 1562]

GHOSTLY

[Brooke 1562]

 

 

GLADE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: n. 3. A clear or bright space in the sky; a flash (of light or lightning). (Obsolete.)

GLADSOME

[Brooke 1562]

GLEAD

[Brooke 1562]

GRAFF (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

GUEST

[Brooke 1562: geast, guest]

GRAVE (v. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

GRIPE (n., 3)

[Brooke 1562]

GRISLY

[Brooke 1562]

GROSS

[Brooke 1562]

GROVEL

[Brooke 1562]

GUERDON

[Brooke 1562]

GUERDONLESS

[Brooke 1562]

GUY

[Brooke 1562]

 OED: v. 1. transitive. To conduct or lead on the way; = GUIDE; to direct the course of (a vehicle, an instrument, etc.). (Obsolete.)

HALT

[Brooke 1562]

OED 1933: adj. Halt obs. form of Haught a.OED: s.v. haught: archaic. 1. High in one’s own estimation; bearing oneself loftily; haughty. archaic.

HAP

[Brooke 1562]

HAPLY

[Brooke 1562]

OED: Now archaic and poetic. (a) Perhaps, possibly; maybe. Cf. mayhap adv.  (b) By chance, by accident; (also) luckily, fortunately (contextually: unfortunately).

HARDY

[Brooke 1562]

HEED

[Brooke 1562]

HENT

[Brooke 1562]

HEREIN

[Brooke 1562]

HEREWITH

[Brooke 1562: herewithal]

HEREOF

[Brooke 1562]

HERETOFORE

[Brooke 1562]

HEST

[Brooke 1562]

HIE

[Brooke 1562]

HIGHT (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

HIRE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: n. 3. figurative. Reward, recompense, payment (for work or service of any kind).

HOARISH (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

 OED: Somewhat hoary. (Obsolete.)

HOLP

[Brooke 1562]

HUSBANDMAN

[Brooke 1562]

OED:  II. 3.a. A worker who tills and cultivates the soil; a farmer, typically one who works a smallholding. Also English regional (northern) and Scottish: the holder of a husbandland, a manorial tenant.

IMBRUE

[Brooke 1562]

IMPORTUNE

[Brooke 1562: importune, importuness]

INDITE

[Brooke 1562]

INDUE

[Brooke 1562]

INGRAVE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: v., transitive. To put in a grave; to entomb, bury. (Obsolete.)

IWIS

[Brooke 1562: y-wis]

JENNET

[Brooke 1562]

JEOPARDY

[Brooke 1562]

JUICE

[Brooke 1562: juiceless]

KINDLY (adj., 3)

[Brooke 1562]

LADE

[Brooke 1562: laded]

OED: II. To draw water. 5. a. transitive. To draw (water); to take up or remove (water or other fluids) from a river, a vessel, etc., with a ladle, scoop, or by similar means; to bale. †occasionally with cognate obj. (Now chiefly technical and dialect)

†6. To empty by ‘lading’. Obsolete.

LASH (n.)

[Brooke 1562]

LAST

[Brooke 1562: lasten]

LAVISH

[Brooke 1562]

LECHER

[Brooke 1562]

LEECH (n., 3)

[Brooke 1562]

LEESE

[Brooke 1562: lore 1813]

LET (v. 2)

[Brooke 1562: 1620, 2621]

LEWD

[Brooke 1562]

LIST (v., 4)

[Brooke 1562]

LO

[Brooke 1562]

LORN

[Brooke 1562]

LODESTAR

[Brooke 1562]

LOT (n. 1, 3)

[Brooke 1562]

LOTH

[Brooke 1562]

 

 

LOWER (v. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

LURK

[Brooke 1562]

LUST (n. 3)

[Brooke 1562]

MAIL (n. 2)

[Brooke 1562]

MATE (n. 2)

[Brooke 1562: make, mate]

MASK (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

“The masque was an evening entertainment in which the chief performers were masked courtiers, accompanied by torchbearers, all in costumes appropriate to the device presented: the elements of song and dialogue were developed later, the original nucleus being dances and conversations with spectators selected by the masquers.” (Edward Hall, Chronicles, in John W. Cunliffe. 1907. “Italian prototypes of the Masque and Dumb Shows.” MLA 22 (1): 146); “Disguised courtiers with torches, who dance with ladies selected from the spectators” (Cunliffe, 150: https://www.jstor.org/stable/456663?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents).

MAUGRE

[Brooke 1562]

MEANS

[Brooke 1562: means, mean]

MEASURE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: v., II. To moderate, regulate; to make proportional or commensurate.

MISHAP

[Brooke 1562]

MOCK

[Brooke 1562]

OED: 1.a. transitive. To deceive or impose upon; to delude, befool; to tantalize, disappoint.

MOE

[Brooke 1562: moe, mo]

MUET

[Brooke 1562]

MUZZLE (v.)

[Brooke 1562: moosled]

NE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: adv.: not; cong.: nor

NIGH

[Brooke 1562]

NILL (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

 

 

NOULD

[Brooke 1562]

LEME Spenser 1579

NURSE-CHILD

[Brooke 1562]

OFT

[Brooke 1562]

OURSELF

[Brooke 1562]

OUTRAGE (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

OVERBLOW

[Brooke 1562]

OVERGO

[Brooke 1562]

OVERSOON

[Brooke 1562]

OED: A. adv. Too soon; †too quickly or readily (Obsolete.)

PALLET (n. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

PARAMOUR

[Brooke 1562]

PARDONS

[Brooke 1562]

PEISE (v., trans. 1)

[Brooke 1562]

PERCASE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: adv.

1. In a statement of fact: by chance; as it happens or happened. (Obsolete.)

2. Expressing a hypothetical, contingent or uncertain possibility: it may chance or be the case that; perhaps, maybe, possibly. Now rare (archaic and English regional).

3. In a conditional clause (with if, except, lest, etc.): by any chance, as may happen, as may be the case, as is possible. (Obsolete.)

LEME Bartolomaeus  Anglicus1582, Coles 1667

PERCHER

[Brooke 1562]

OED: n. 1 Now archaic and rare. A large candle of wax or tallow, esp. one used on an altar.

PIECEMEAL

[Brooke 1562]

PINE

[Brooke 1562]

PLIGHT (v.)

[Brooke 1562: 145, 562]

PLIGHT (n., 2)

[Brooke 1562]

PLIGHT (v.)

[Brooke 1562: 2,635]

OED: 2. transitive. To enfold in one’s arms; to embrace. rare

POMP

[Brooke 1562]

IN POST

[Brooke 1562]

†P4. in post  [after Middle French, French en poste (1497–8); compare Middle French courir la poste to go very quickly (1522)]: in the manner or capacity of a courier or bearer of dispatches; (hence) at express speed, in haste. (Obsolete.)

POST-HORSE

[Brooke 1562]

PRACTISE

[Brooke 1562]

PRESS (n., 1)

[Brooke 1562]

PRIVATE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: adj. 3.b particular or special (Obsolete.)

QUAIL

[Brooke 1562]

QUARRIER

[Brooke 1562]

 OED: n. 2 A large square candle.

QUELL

[Brooke 1562]

QUENCH

[Brooke 1562]

QUICK (n.)

[Brooke 1562]

QUIT (v., 4)

[Brooke 1562]

QUOTH

[Brooke 1562: quod]

RACE(n. 2, 2)

[Brooke 1562]

RAKE (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

RAMP (v.)

[Brooke 1562]

RAMPIRE (n.)

[Brooke 1562]

RAUGHT[Brooke 1562: raft, raught]
RAVISHER[Brooke 1562]
REAVE[Brooke 1562: reave, reaved, reft]
RECKLESS[Brooke 1562]
RECURE (v. 2 obsolete)[Brooke 1562]
REDE[Brooke 1562]
RESPITE[Brooke 1562]
RESTIVE[Brooke 1562: restiness]
OED: agj. 1. Characterized by erratic or adverse behaviour arising from discontent, disquiet, etc. Cf. restiff adj. 1a.In 19th-cent. examples it is frequently difficult to tell whether restlessness (as in the emergent sense 1c) or recalcitrance is the primary sense of the word.  a. Of a horse: refusing to go forward; stubbornly standing still; obstinately moving backwards or to the side when being driven or ridden; resisting control, intractable, refractory. Now rare.
RIFE[Brooke 1562]
RIVE[Brooke 1562]
ROUND (v., 2)[Brooke 1562]
ROUT (n., 2)[Brooke 1562]
RUE[Brooke 1562]
RUSH (n.)[Brooke 1562]
RUTH[Brooke 1562]
SALVE[Brooke 1562]
SAUCE (v.)[Brooke 1562]
SCALDING[Brooke 1562]
SCANT (adv.)[Brooke 1562: 16]
SCARCE (adv.)[Brooke 1562]
SCOUT (n.)[Brooke 1562]
SEEK[Brooke 1562: seech, seek]
SEELY[Brooke 1562]
SELD[Brooke 1562]
SELF (adj.)[Brooke 1562]
SHAMEFAST[Brooke 1562]
  
  
SHAPE (v.)[Brooke 1562: shope]
OED: †15. a. reflexive. To set oneself, prepare. Const. to with infinitive, or for. (Obsolete.) Very common in Chaucer.
SHEND[Brooke 1562]
SHIFT (n.)[Brooke 1562]
SHRIFT[Brooke 1562]
SHRIVE[Brooke 1562]
SHROUD[Brooke 1562]
SHUN[Brooke 1562: shun, shonne]
SICKEN[Brooke 1562: seek 413]
SIGHTLY[Brooke 1562]
SITH[Brooke 1562]
SLEIGHT[Brooke 1562]
SLOTH[Brooke 1562]
SOMEDEAL[Brooke 1562]
SMITTEN[Brooke 1562]
SORE (adv.)[Brooke 1562]
SPEED[Brooke 1562: sped]
SPILL[Brooke 1562]
SPRITE[Brooke 1562]
STAGGER[Brooke 1562]
STAKE[Brooke 1562]
STAY (n. 3)[Brooke 1562]
STAIN[Brooke 1562]
OED: v., 1.c. To obscure the lustre of. literal and figurative. (Obsolete.)
STARVE(v., 1.3)[Brooke 1562: starve, sterve]
STEAD (n.)[Brooke 1562: steed]
STERN[Brooke 1562]
STICK[Brooke 1562]
OED: †19. a. intransitive. To be reluctant or unwilling (to do something); to hesitate, to scruple. Chiefly in negative constructions (e.g. he did not stick to). (Obsolete.)
STRAIT[Brooke 1562: straitly]
STRIKE[Brooke 1562: strake]
  
STRIEP[Brooke 1562]
 OED: n., 2.a. A stroke or lash with a whip or scourge. Now archaic, chiefly in plural.†b. A stroke of divine judgement. Obsolete.
STURDY[Brooke 1562]
SUCCOUR[Brooke 1562]
SUE[Brooke 1562]
SUIT (n., 6)[Brooke 1562]
SWATHING BAND[Brooke 1562]
SWOON[Brooke 1562: sownd]
TAIL (n.1, 7a)[Brooke 1562]
TAUNTING[Brooke 1562]
TEAR (v. 1)[Brooke 1562: tear, tare]
TEARY[Brooke 1562]
TESTY[Brooke 1562]

THEMSELF

[Brooke 1562]

THRALL

[Brooke 1562]

THRONG

[Brooke 1562]

THROUGH-GIRT

[Brooke 1562]

TICKLE

[Brooke 1562: tickel]

 OED: adj. 5. Not to be depended upon; uncertain (in fact, action, duration, etc.); unreliable; changeable, inconstant, capricious, fickle, ‘kittle’. Now dialect.

TILTH

[Brooke 1562: tilt]

TOFORE

[Brooke 1562]

TOOTING HOLE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: peep-hole (s.v. tooting, n., 1:  spying, peeping, looking.)

TOY

[Brooke 1562]

TRIM (adj., 4)[Brooke 1562]
TROTH[Brooke 1562]
TROW[Brooke 1562]
TRUMP (n., 2)

[Brooke 1562]

TWAIN (adj.)

[Brooke 1562]

UNALLURE

[Brooke 1562]

UNGRATE

[Brooke 1562]

UNMINDED

[Brooke 1562]

UNTHRIFTY

[Brooke 1562]

OED: 1. a. Producing or bringing about no advantage, profit, or gain; tending to, resulting in, or marked by thriftlessness, waste, or extravagance; unprofitable, wasteful; harmful.

UNWARES

[Brooke 1562]

UNWIELDLY

[Brooke 1562]

URE

[Brooke 1562]

OED: n. 1 Obsolete. I. in ure  1. a. In or into use, practice, or performance. Often with verbs, as bringcomehave, and esp. put (frequently c1510–1630). Also rarely with into.

VISOR (n., 3)

[Brooke 1562]

WALTER

[Brooke 1562]

 OED: v.1, I intransitive, 1.a. To roll to and fro, move from side to side; to tumble or toss about; to lie sprawling on the ground, in mire, etc. (Obsolete.).

WARDER

[Brooke 1562]

WARE (n.)

[Brooke 1562]

WARE (adj.)

[Brooke 1562: 886]

WARELESS

[Brooke 1562]

 OED: adg.,1. Unwary, incautious, imprudent. (Obsolete.)

WARILY

[Brooke 1562: warely]

WAX (v., 2)

[Brooke 1562: wox, waxen]

WEAR

[Brooke 1562: wear, ware]

WEED (n., 2)

[Brooke 1562]

WEEN

[Brooke 1562]

WELLAWAY

[Brooke 1562]

WELL-NIGH

[Brooke 1562]

WENCH

[Brooke 1562]

WEND

[Brooke 1562]

WHENSO

[Brooke 1562]

WHEREAS

[Brooke 1562: 2595]

†1. = where adv., and conj. (Obsolete or rare archaic).

WHEREAT

[Brooke 1562]

WHERESO

[Brooke 1562]

WHERETO

[Brooke 1562]

WETSHOD

[Brooke 1562]

WHET

[Brooke 1562]

WHIT

[Brooke 1562]

WHOSO

[Brooke 1562]

WIGHT

[Brooke 1562]

WILE

[Brooke 1562]

WILY

[Brooke 1562]

WIN

[Brooke 1562: wan]

WINK (n.)

[Brooke 1562]

WITHOUTEN

[Brooke 1562]

WITHSTAND

[Brooke 1562]

WON (v. archaic)

[Brooke 1562]

WONT

[Brooke 1562]

WRACKFUL

[Brooke 1562]

WREAKFUL

[Brooke 1562]

WREAK (v., 2)

[Brooke 1562]

WRING

[Brooke 1562: wring, wringed, wrang]

WROTH

[Brooke 1562]

-Y

[Brooke 1562]

OED: Perfective or intensive sense.